HomeAlbum ReviewsHelion Prime’s ‘Question Everything’ Re-Issue Builds On The Success Of Its Predecessor

Helion Prime’s ‘Question Everything’ Re-Issue Builds On The Success Of Its Predecessor

A little more than a year after the release of its album, Question Everything, Helion Prime has re-visited that album with a re-issue of the record.  Released Oct. 8, the album’s re-issue is highlighted by its bonus content.  The album’s bonus content consists of seven songs that did not make the final cut for the album’s original 2020 release.  One of the most notable of the previously released originals is the single, ‘Wash Away.’  It will be discussed shortly.  Also of note is the band’s cover of Children of Bodom’s ‘Angels Don’t Kill.’  It will be discussed a little later.  The band’s re-worked version of its original song, ‘The Human Condition’ is yet another example of what makes the album’s bonus content stand out.  When it is considered along with the other bonus songs examined here and with the rest of the bonus tracks, the whole of the bonus content lives up to its title and makes Question Everything’s re-issue another successful offering from Helion Prime.

Helion Prime’s recently release re-issue of Question Everything takes the success of that album and builds on it even more.  That is due to its bonus content.  One of the most notable bonus tracks featured in the album’s re-issue comes in the form of ‘Wash Away.’  The song’s musical arrangement fits well with so much of the content featured in the album’s original body.  The big, over the top guitar solo in the bridge, the richness in the drums and bass, the operatic vocals of front woman Mary Zimmer and the general guitar line gives the arrangement the sound of those vintage power metal ballads that were made so popular way back in the late 80s and early 90s.  No, this song is not a power ballad, but it has that stylistic approach but thankfully avoids the cheese of those songs.  It has more of the confidence of Helion Prime’s own works and those of the band’s fellow power metal counterparts, Unleash The Archers.

Making the song stand out even more is its lyrical theme.  The lyrical theme featured in this song follows those of the songs featured in the album in its original release.  It pays tribute to so many well-known scientists and great minds in general across history.  In the case of this song, it pays homage to Ignaz Sammelweis, who discovered the health benefits of hand-washing in 1847.  Considering everything going on in the world today, this is a fitting inclusion in the album’s re-issue.  Even more important to note is that at no point does the band try to get preachy about it, trying to connect the song to the COVID-19 pandemic.  If anything, it just comes across as being connected to the album’s overall theme of celebrating those noted great minds.  This makes the song all the more appealing and just one example of what makes this re-issue successful.  Also of note among the bonus tracks is the band’s cover of Children of Bodom’s ‘Angels Don’t Kill.’

Helion Prime’s cover of ‘Angels Don’t Kill’ The band’s take on this song stays true to its source material.  There is no doubt about that.  At the same time though, the band puts its own touch to the song with its power metal approach.  The use of the keyboards alongside the guitars actually works surprisingly well throughout.  On the other hand though, Simmer’s vocals just do not sound good here.  She comes across as sounding like she was straining way too hard with the screams.  It sadly does not match up to the vocals of the late great Alexi Laiho.  That is not to say that her vocals were a failure, but it just sounds like she was trying too hard to deliver the same style vocals as Laiho.  Odds are she has talent with more guttural vocals, but it just simply did not work here.  That aside, the song still mostly works, and is a still positive addition to the re-issue’s bonus content.  It is just one more of the notable bonus tracks featured in the re-issue, too.  The re-worked take of the band’s original, ‘The Human Condition’ is yet another notable entry in the re-issue’s bonus content.

Helion Prime’s re-worked take of ‘The Human Condition’ stands out because of its production.  Originally featured in the band’s 2018 album, Terror of the Cybernetic Space Monster, the re-recorded (IE remastered) take on the song stays fully true to the original work.  Nothing was added to or taken from the original.other than the vocals.  Songwriter Jason Ashcraft and former vocalist Sozos Michael handled vocal duties on the original song.  Zimmer and Ashcraft pair up in the new rendition, which also sounds fuller through the remastering.  The impact is just as powerful here as in the original composition.  When this song is considered along with the other remastered songs featured in the record, the covers and the one previously unreleased new song, the whole of the bonus content more than makes the re-issue successful.  They make the presentation one that audiences will enjoy just as much as the album’s original presentation if not more so.

Helion Prime’s recently released re-issue of its 2020 album, Question Everything is a positive new presentation that audiences across the board will enjoy.  The record’s success is due primarily to its bonus content.  From a previously unreleased original to a series of remastered originals from a past album, to a pair of covers, the bonus content featured here does well to build on the success of the album from its original release.  All things considered, that blend of content – as evidenced through the examination presented here – makes the re-issue of Question Everything just as enjoyable as the original work if not more so.

Helion Prime’s re-issue of Question Everything is available now. More information on the band’s Question Everything re-issue is available along with all of the band’s latest news and more at:

Websitehttps://helionprimemetal.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/helionprimemetal

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